Turing Fibonacci Apple-Giclée-Czar Catstick-BFA Hub Online Art Gallery Big Fat Arts Fine Art Prints
Turing Fibonacci Apple-Giclée-Czar Catstick-BFA Hub Online Art Gallery Big Fat Arts Fine Art Prints
Turing Fibonacci Apple-Giclée-Czar Catstick-30.5 cm x 30.5 cm, 12.0 inches x 12.0 inches-BFA Hub Online Art Gallery Big Fat Arts Fine Art Prints
Turing Fibonacci Apple-Giclée-Czar Catstick-50.8 cm x 50.8 cm, 20.0 inches x 20.0 inches-BFA Hub Online Art Gallery Big Fat Arts Fine Art Prints
Turing Fibonacci Apple-Giclée-Czar Catstick-40.6 cm x 40.6 cm, 16.0 inches x 16.0 inches-BFA Hub Online Art Gallery Big Fat Arts Fine Art Prints
Turing Fibonacci Apple-Giclée-Czar Catstick-76.2 cm x 76.2 cm, 30.0 inches x 30.0 inches-BFA Hub Online Art Gallery Big Fat Arts Fine Art Prints
Turing Fibonacci Apple-Giclée-Czar Catstick-59.4 cm x 59.4 cm, 23.4 inches x 23.4 inches-BFA Hub Online Art Gallery Big Fat Arts Fine Art Prints
Turing Fibonacci Apple-Giclée-Czar Catstick-91.4 cm x 91.4 cm, 36.0 inches x 36.0 inches-BFA Hub Online Art Gallery Big Fat Arts Fine Art Prints
Czar Catstick

Turing Fibonacci Apple

Regular price £ 36.00 GBP £ 0.00 GBP Unit price per
Tax included.

Bespoke Fine Art via BFA Hub - buy direct from the artist

Digital Open Editions* - range of sizes - only available via this site.

Alan Turing Series

Where Science meets Art.

Pop Art Alan Turing portrait with Fibonacci Apple as homage to 'The Son of Man' Magritte painting, with reference to his possible cause of death (see below)**

  • Type: Fine-Art Print

  • Medium: Giclée

  • Materials: 100% Cotton Paper

  • Paper: Hahnemühle German Etching

  • Image: Approx 80% of overall paper size

  • Product Type: Digital Open Edition*

  • This artwork is sold ready to frame

Large artwork is shipped rolled in a secure tube.

Artworks in this series will work well in any modern room setting.

Effective, for instance, when you group together as a set.

Similarly, just as effective when you use single images, for example, set off against simple gallery-style frames.

Editions Information

* Digital Open Edition Prints are printed on a range of Fine Art Papers using Archive Inks. Print stock will clearly be shown at point of purchase. As the name suggests; there's no limit to the number of prints issued. These prints are unsigned.

Digital Open Editions are a new concept where the cost is kept low by using an automated process. An inexpensive way to collect fine art prints produced with the very finest art papers, using museum quality archival inks.

Importantly and above all, we hope you are happy with your investment so we offer a no quibbles returns policy.

Giftware and Open Editions

Alternatively, we sell many of the artworks in this collection as Open Editions via 3rd party sites.

Likewise, you can find more information on other options, textiles and giftware and framing HERE

Framing

Regards framing, If possible, we would always recommend that you consider bespoke framing for the Gallery and Limited Editions.

However, many sizes are standard so you should find it easy to find frames in-store or online. More info HERE

As mentioned, you also have the option to buy different types of merchandise.

Alternative products include framed prints via 3rd party sites such as Saatchi,  Redbubble or sites listed HERE

In conclusion, you have many options available. Please contact with any questions or if you wish to commission a unique bespoke order. 

 

**Alan Turing Series: Fibonacci Apple

On 8 June 1954, Turing's housekeeper found him dead. He had died the previous day. A post-mortem examination established that the cause of death was cyanide poisoning. When his body was discovered, an apple lay half-eaten beside his bed, and although the apple was not tested for cyanide, it was speculated that this was the means by which a fatal dose was consumed. An inquest determined that he had committed suicide, and he was cremated at Woking Crematorium on 12 June 1954.
Turing's ashes were scattered there, just as his father's had been. Andrew Hodges and another biographer, David Leavitt, have both suggested that Turing was re-enacting a scene from the Walt Disney film Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937), his favourite fairy tale, both noting that (in Leavitt's words) he took "an especially keen pleasure in the scene where the Wicked Queen immerses her apple in the poisonous brew"
Philosophy professor Jack Copeland has questioned various aspects of the coroner's historical verdict. He suggests an alternative explanation for the cause of Turing's death, this being the accidental inhalation of cyanide fumes from an apparatus for gold electroplating spoons, which uses potassium cyanide to dissolve the gold. Turing had such an apparatus set up in his tiny spare room. Copeland notes that the autopsy findings were more consistent with inhalation than with ingestion of the poison. Turing also habitually ate an apple before bed, and it was not unusual for it to be discarded half-eaten. In addition, Turing had reportedly borne his legal setbacks and hormone treatment (which had been discontinued a year previously) "with good humour" and had shown no sign of despondency prior to his death, setting down, in fact, a list of tasks he intended to complete upon return to his office after the holiday weekend.
At the time, Turing's mother believed that the ingestion was accidental, resulting from her son's careless storage of laboratory chemicals. Biographer Andrew Hodges suggests that Turing may have arranged the cyanide experiment deliberately, to give his mother some plausible deniability.

**Approximate logarithmic spirals can occur in nature (for example, the arms of spiral galaxies or phyllotaxis of leaves); golden spirals are one special case of these logarithmic spirals. A recent analysis of spirals observed in mouse corneal epithelial cells indicated that some can be characterised by the golden spiral, and some by other spirals It is sometimes stated that spiral galaxies and nautilus shells get wider in the pattern of a golden spiral, and hence are related to both φ and the Fibonacci series. In truth, spiral galaxies and nautilus shells (and many mollusk shells) exhibit logarithmic spiral growth, but at a variety of angles usually distinctly different from that of the golden spiral. This pattern allows the organism to grow without changing shape.

This series has been updated, reworked and released as Digital Open Editions with a range of sizes only available via this site. The Alan Turing collection was the inspiration for my (still ongoing) Fibonacci Series of artworks.

Artworks in this series include collages of Equations, Binary Code, Fibonacci Curves and  Numbers, Pattern Formations based on his experimental work on the Chemical Basis of Morphogenesis plus notes from Alan Turing's life.

An addition to 'The Great Reset' 10101 Collection.


Artist: Czar Catstick works as 'The Emperor's New Clothes Collective'.

BFA Hub - Bespoke Fine Art Gallery Online

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